Frequently Asked Questions about Social Security Disability Benefits

Social Security Disability is a government program that aims to help support people financially when they’ve been injured and can not work or adapt to a new line of work. It also helps to protect people who are chronically disabled and never had the opportunity to work.

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Social Security Disability Income benefits are designed to pay those who are disabled and unable to work for at least a year. To qualify for Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), the jobs you have worked need to have paid into the Social Security fund and the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) tax.

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While many different types of cancer will qualify to receive benefits, your approval process for benefits will depend on the type, stage, location and how well your cancer is responding to, or expected to, respond to treatment.

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You’ve been injured or have a disability that will prevent you from working. You know you might qualify for social security benefits but don’t know which to apply for: Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Which one do you apply for?

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If you are new to social security benefits, you may find yourself asking what the difference is between Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). These are two terms that you will hear often, and the main difference comes down to the central focus of work history.

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This question is asked quite often and the answer is yes. There is no restriction on receiving Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) if you’re already receiving Worker’s Compensation benefits. The only caveat is that the combination of the two program payments must not exceed 80% of your original salary from working.

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There are two kinds of disability insurance provided by the Social Security Administration (SSA): Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Social Security Disability Insurance is the larger of the two programs, intended for workers who have become disabled and are no longer able to do their job

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We are not affiliated with the Social Security Administration (SSA), nor do we have any connection with the federal government.

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The Social Security Administration (SSA) determines if someone is eligible for benefits based on the type of disability an individual is experiencing. The SSA uses a document called the “Blue Book” to decide whether or not a claimant’s condition is disabling and eligible to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

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Compassionate Allowances is a term given by the Social Security Administration (SSA) to identify diseases and other medical conditions that are already identified to meet the standards and requirements to receive Social Security Disability benefits. These conditions are considered to be the most serious disabilities and are treated with more urgency than other disabilities.Read More 
If you have recently been denied Social Security Disability Insurance benefits, you may be asking yourself why. There are many reasons why SSDI applications are denied which include financial resources, work history, and medical condition or disability.Read More 
The social security “Blue Book” is a document utilized by the Social Security Administration (SSA) to determine if a disability is eligible to receive benefits. It is broken into two parts: Adult Listings (Part A) and Childhood Listings (Part B). It also contains a general guide of the process for applying for Social Security Disability benefits which can be a useful reference as it is created by the institution that will make the decision on if you qualify or not.Read More 
If you have started receiving Social Security benefits, or if you are applying to receive benefits, you may be wondering if you will need to pay taxes on the benefits you receive from the Social Security Administration (SSA). For the most part, these benefits are tax-free, as to qualify to receive benefits you must not be able to work for a year or more as well as meet their income eligibility requirements.  While most benefit recipients will not pay taxes, there are situations where you may need to pay federal income taxes on your Social Security benefits.Read More 
The question of work is a common one when it comes to Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits. Generally speaking, an individual must be unable to work as a result of their disability for them to be eligible to receive disability benefits as financial support. While that is the case for many SSD recipients, there are some situations where an individual may be able to perform some work in order to earn an income as they wait for their benefits application to be processed.Read More 
COVID-19 has impacted us in different ways. From health issues to the economic downturn, every person has felt the effects of the pandemic in different ways. For some, that means that getting a needed Social Security disability claim paid can go from being a routine matter to a life-threatening endeavor if one needs to go to the Social Security office to clear up any misunderstanding. This can add a layer of difficulty that goes beyond paying for medical expenses, rent, and food.Read More 
Military veterans suffering from a disability that has impacted their ability to work and generate income may be surprised to discover their eligibility for certain benefits, such as health care benefits offered by the Veterans Administration and disability-related compensation, which will vary depending on how they were discharged.Read More 
If you are applying for Social Security disability benefits, it is important to be prepared for a multi-phase, intensive review process that is conducted by the Social Security Administration (“SSA”). For example, when you apply for disability benefits, expect a call or other correspondence from your local Social Security office looking to schedule a time to conduct an in-person interview at the office or a phone interview.Read More 
When applying for Social Security disability benefits, do not be surprised if your initial application is denied. According to data from the Social Security Administration (SSA), close to 70 percent of initial disability applications are denied. As you can see, if your disability benefits application is denied, you are not alone. The key is to not give up hope and press forward by filing an appeal of the denial. The first step of the appeal process is to request reconsideration.Read More 

When someone is awarded Social Security disability benefits and begins receiving monthly checks, they often ask, “do I have to pay taxes on this income?” The answer is…it depends. As a general rule, disability benefits are considered to be income subject to taxation, according to the Internal Revenue Service. However, many individuals receiving disability benefits do not actually pay income taxes because they do not have any other source of income.

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